Featured Conference

JASIS 2016JASIS_2016_GuideJASIS (the Japan Analytical & Scientific Instruments Show) is one of the largest exhibitions in Asia. In 2016, it will be held at Makuhari Messe in Chiba-city, Japan, from 7 to 9 September.

Read our online guide.

 

Shedding light on medieval manuscripts

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It is not every issue that one of our articles starts with a quotation in medieval English, and it is appropriate as two of our articles cover the use of spectroscopy in cultural heritage. This is yet another field where the rich information provided by spectroscopy, along with its non-destructive nature (for many techniques), portability and ability to generate chemical images make it the answer to many questions. Kate Nicholson, Andrew Beeby and Richard Gameson are responsible for the medieval English at the start of their article “Shedding light on medieval manuscripts”. They describe the general use of Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of historical artefacts, and, in particular, their work on medieval European manuscripts and 18th century watercolour pigments. They stess the importance of checking the actual laser power density to avoid damage to priceless artefacts.

Read more: Shedding light on medieval manuscripts

 

The application of Fourier transform infrared, near infrared and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy to soil analysis

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Jean Robertson, Charles Shand and Estefania Perez-Fernandez update us on the use of various spectroscopies for soil analysis in “The application of Fourier transform infrared, near infrared and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy to soil analysis”. Once again developments in portable instruments lead to greater ease of use and the ability to measure far more samples. They describe the application of FT-IR, NIR and XRF spectroscopies to the development of the National Soils Inventory of Scotland, and their work in developing the use of handheld instruments, particularly FT-IR spectrometers.

Read more: The application of Fourier transform infrared, near infrared and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy to soil analysis

 

TISCH—Terahertz Imaging and Spectroscopy in Cultural Heritage: applications in archaeology, architecture and art conservation science

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Returning to our cultural heritage theme, Bianca Jackson tells us about “TISCH—Terahertz Imaging and Spectroscopy in Cultural Heritage: applications in archaeology, architecture and art conservation science”. Terahertz spectroscopy and imaging of Paleolithic cave etchings, 14th century paintings in a church and a mid-20th century Italian painting are all described. This helps demonstrate the versatility of the technique as well as its potential in cultural heritage preservation.

Read more: TISCH—Terahertz Imaging and Spectroscopy in Cultural Heritage: applications in archaeology, architecture and art conservation science

   

Gerry Downey: an authentic spectroscopist

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Tony Davies has interviewed Gerard (Gerry) Downey who has just retired from the Irish National Agriculture and Food Research Institute, Teagasc. Gerry will be known to many of you, particularly those who work in the fields of chemometrics, NIR spectroscopy and food & ag. I must have known Gerry for over 25 years and currently work closely with him on the publication of NIR news, so I am particularly delighted that Tony has chosen to highlight his career.

Read more: Gerry Downey: an authentic spectroscopist

 

Spectroscopic evidences to understand the influence of marine environments on Built Heritage

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This article looks at the use of Raman and XRF spectroscopies to investigate the different deterioration processes caused by marine aerosols. These techniques can detect the decay compounds and the original composition of the different materials from historical buildings close to the sea, which can then be used to explain the reactions that take place on them. This helps in the development of remedial actions and preventive conservation strategies for historical buildings.

Read more: Spectroscopic evidences to understand the influence of marine environments on Built Heritage

   

Synchrotron-based micro Fourier transform infrared mapping to investigate the spatial distribution of amorphous and crystalline calcium carbonate in earthworm-secreted calcium carbonate balls

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Earthworm secretions are of interest to Mark Hodson, Liane Benning, Gianfelice Cinque, Bea Demarchi, Mark Frogley, Kirsty Penkman, Juan Rodriguez-Blanco, Paul Schofield, Emma Versteegh and Katia Wehbe in “Synchrotron-based micro Fourier transform infrared mapping to investigate the spatial distribution of amorphous and crystalline calcium carbonate in earthworm-secreted calcium carbonate balls”. Several earthworm species secrete very small granules of calcium carbonate, and the authors think these are involved in pH regulation. These granules contain different polymorphs of calcium carbonate, including the amorphous form which is very unstable in the laboratory. To investigate this they have FT-IR spectroscopy and mapping, and are continuing this work with Ca XANES.

Read more: Synchrotron-based micro Fourier transform infrared mapping to investigate the spatial distribution of amorphous and crystalline calcium carbonate in earthworm-secreted calcium carbonate balls

 

Infrared spectroscopic techniques for the non-invasive and rapid quality control of Chinese traditional medicine Si-Wu-Tang

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Christian Huck and co-authors look at “Infrared spectroscopic techniques for the non-invasive and rapid quality control of Chinese traditional medicine Si-Wu-Tang”. They have used benchtop mid-IR and NIR as well as portable NIR instruments for quick and non-invasive quality control of this traditional Chinese medicine. Adulterations could be detected, as well as the raw herbs and different sources of the Si-Wu-Tang. The success of the mobile NIR instrument is particularly interesting due to the growing interest in such technology for its ease-of-use and cost.

Read more: Infrared spectroscopic techniques for the non-invasive and rapid quality control of Chinese traditional medicine Si-Wu-Tang

   

There are standards—and there is THE standard

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In their Sampling Column, Kim Esbensen and Claas Wagner stray into Quality Matters territory as they look at standards and how they work with the Theory of Sampling. Kim and Claas are concerned that many international standards do not comply with the TOS and that this compromises the results.

Read more: There are standards—and there is THE standard

 

Analytica Report 2016

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In the last issue, I reported on many new products introduced at Pittcon. This time, I’ve been to Analytica in Munich, Germany. Whilst many of the new products there had already been seen at Pittcon (and so are not included again), there was still plenty of new instrumentation. We also have a short New Products section and a Product Focus on Imaging Spectroscopy.

Read more: Analytica Report 2016

   

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