Featured Conference

JASIS 2016JASIS (the Japan Analytical & Scientific Instruments Show) is one of the largest exhibitions in Asia. In 2016, it will be held at Makuhari Messe in Chiba-city, Japan, from 7 to 9 September.

Find our more at www.jasis.jp.

 

Spectroscopic evidences to understand the influence of marine environments on Built Heritage

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This article looks at the use of Raman and XRF spectroscopies to investigate the different deterioration processes caused by marine aerosols. These techniques can detect the decay compounds and the original composition of the different materials from historical buildings close to the sea, which can then be used to explain the reactions that take place on them. This helps in the development of remedial actions and preventive conservation strategies for historical buildings.

Read more: Spectroscopic evidences to understand the influence of marine environments on Built Heritage

 

Synchrotron-based micro Fourier transform infrared mapping to investigate the spatial distribution of amorphous and crystalline calcium carbonate in earthworm-secreted calcium carbonate balls

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Earthworm secretions are of interest to Mark Hodson, Liane Benning, Gianfelice Cinque, Bea Demarchi, Mark Frogley, Kirsty Penkman, Juan Rodriguez-Blanco, Paul Schofield, Emma Versteegh and Katia Wehbe in “Synchrotron-based micro Fourier transform infrared mapping to investigate the spatial distribution of amorphous and crystalline calcium carbonate in earthworm-secreted calcium carbonate balls”. Several earthworm species secrete very small granules of calcium carbonate, and the authors think these are involved in pH regulation. These granules contain different polymorphs of calcium carbonate, including the amorphous form which is very unstable in the laboratory. To investigate this they have FT-IR spectroscopy and mapping, and are continuing this work with Ca XANES.

Read more: Synchrotron-based micro Fourier transform infrared mapping to investigate the spatial distribution of amorphous and crystalline calcium carbonate in earthworm-secreted calcium carbonate balls

 

Infrared spectroscopic techniques for the non-invasive and rapid quality control of Chinese traditional medicine Si-Wu-Tang

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Christian Huck and co-authors look at “Infrared spectroscopic techniques for the non-invasive and rapid quality control of Chinese traditional medicine Si-Wu-Tang”. They have used benchtop mid-IR and NIR as well as portable NIR instruments for quick and non-invasive quality control of this traditional Chinese medicine. Adulterations could be detected, as well as the raw herbs and different sources of the Si-Wu-Tang. The success of the mobile NIR instrument is particularly interesting due to the growing interest in such technology for its ease-of-use and cost.

Read more: Infrared spectroscopic techniques for the non-invasive and rapid quality control of Chinese traditional medicine Si-Wu-Tang

   

There are standards—and there is THE standard

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In their Sampling Column, Kim Esbensen and Claas Wagner stray into Quality Matters territory as they look at standards and how they work with the Theory of Sampling. Kim and Claas are concerned that many international standards do not comply with the TOS and that this compromises the results.

Read more: There are standards—and there is THE standard

 

Analytica Report 2016

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In the last issue, I reported on many new products introduced at Pittcon. This time, I’ve been to Analytica in Munich, Germany. Whilst many of the new products there had already been seen at Pittcon (and so are not included again), there was still plenty of new instrumentation. We also have a short New Products section and a Product Focus on Imaging Spectroscopy.

Read more: Analytica Report 2016

   

Dates and fates of pyrogenic carbon: using spectroscopy to understand a “missing” global carbon sink

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Research into climate change takes many directions, but storing carbon or understanding its release from stores is extremely important. Philippa Ascough, Michael Bird, Will Meredith and Colin Snape tell us about “Dates and fates of pyrogenic carbon: using spectroscopy to understand a “missing” global carbon sink”. Pyrogenic carbon comes from the incomplete burning of biomass, and can be natural, e.g. wild fires, or man-made, e.g. the production of charcoal. The authors describe the uses of a range of spectroscopy techniques to understand the molecular structure of pyrogenic carbon and its role in the global carbon cycle..

Read more: Dates and fates of pyrogenic carbon: using spectroscopy to understand a “missing” global carbon sink

 

Infrared spectroscopy as a tool to study plant cuticles

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Much of the exterior surface of plants is covered by the cuticle. This plays a vital role in protecting the plant from water loss, attack by pests and pathogens and damage from UV radiation. Infrared spectroscopy is very useful in characterising cuticles, as we learn in “Infrared spectroscopy as a tool to study plant cuticles” by José Heredia-Guerrero, José Benítez, Eva Domínguez, Ilker Bayer, Roberto Cingolani, Athanassia Athanassioua and Antonio Heredia. The authors point out that, whilst still in its early stages, infrared spectroscopy has provided valuable information about the functional groups, chemical structure and arrangement and interactions of plant cuticle components.

Read more: Infrared spectroscopy as a tool to study plant cuticles

   

Central spectroscopic data systems: why are chromatographers so much better equipped?

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In the Tony Davies Column, Tony is getting jealous of chromatographers in “Central spectroscopic data systems: why are chromatographers so much better equipped?”. Replicating the power of chromatography data systems for spectroscopic data is not that easy.

Read more: Central spectroscopic data systems: why are chromatographers so much better equipped?

 

Is your spectrometer in calibration?

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“Is your spectrometer in calibration?” ask Chris Burgess and John Hammond. The answer may not be as straightforward as you might think. However, Chris and John explain all.

Read more: Is your spectrometer in calibration?

   

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